Advertising and Promotions Managers
Plan programs to generate interest in a product or service. They work with art directors, sales agents, and financial staff members.
This is what you may be doing
  • Work with department heads or staff to discuss topics such as contracts, selection of advertising media, or products to be advertised
  • Gather and organize information to plan advertising campaigns
  • Plan the advertising, including which media to advertise in, such as radio, television, print, online, and billboards
  • Negotiate advertising contracts
  • Inspect layouts, which are sketches or plans for an advertisement
  • Initiate market research studies and analyze their findings
  • Develop pricing strategies for products to be marketed, balancing the goals of a firm with customer satisfaction
  • Meet with clients to provide marketing or technical advice
  • Direct the hiring of advertising, promotions, and marketing staff and oversee their daily activities

Advertising managers create interest among potential buyers of a product or service for a department, for an entire organization, or on a project basis (account). They work in advertising agencies that put together advertising campaigns for clients, in media firms that sell advertising space or time, and in organizations that advertise heavily. Advertising managers work with sales staff and others to generate ideas for an advertising campaign. They oversee the staff that develops the advertising. They work with the finance department to prepare a budget and cost estimates for the advertising campaign.

Often, advertising managers serve as liaisons between the client requiring the advertising and an advertising or promotion agency that develops and places the ads. In larger organizations with an extensive advertising department, different advertising managers may oversee in-house accounts and creative and media services departments.

In addition, some advertising managers specialize in a particular field or type of advertising. For example, media directors determine the way in which an advertising campaign reaches customers. They can use any or all of various media, including radio, television, newspapers, magazines, the Internet, and outdoor signs. Advertising managers known as account executives manage clients’ accounts, but they don’t develop or supervise the creation or presentation of the advertising. That becomes the work of the creative services department.

Promotions managers  direct programs that combine advertising with purchasing incentives to increase sales. Often, the programs use direct mail, inserts in newspapers, Internet advertisements, in-store displays, product endorsements, or special events to target customers. Purchasing incentives may include discounts, samples, gifts, rebates, coupons, sweepstakes, and contests.

Education

A bachelor’s degree is required for most advertising, promotions, and marketing management positions. For advertising management positions, some employers prefer a bachelor’s degree in advertising or journalism. A relevant course of study might include classes in marketing, consumer behavior, market research, sales, communication methods and technology, visual arts, art history, and photography.

Most marketing managers have a bachelor’s degree. Courses in business law, management, economics, accounting, finance, mathematics, and statistics are advantageous. In addition, completing an internship while in school is highly recommended.